Wednesday, 28 May 2014

Blogging and Booktubing: A Tale of Two Bookish Communities

Once upon a time there were two little princesses, and they lived in a huge, beautiful kingdom. It had so much room, it was able to have deep blue, shimmering oceans; fresh, leafy forests; hot, dry deserts; areas of concrete and cultures otherwise known as cities... some called it 'the world.' Every morning and every night without fail, the sky would become streaked with pink, yellow, and orange watercolour. These two princesses lived on opposite sides of the kingdom and hardly ever met but, funnily enough, they both had long hair as gold as the sunset, and they were forever unknowingly wearing the same regal gowns. Another similarity they had was books - a burning passion for books. However, they both shared their bookish passion in different ways: the first princess would climb to the top of the tallest rock in the kingdom once a week, and she would shout about the books she had read to anyone who would listen. The second princess would carefully print her thoughts on scrolls, and once a week or perhaps even every day, she would hand these out to others who inhabited the kingdom. They were so similar, in fact, that they would constantly be mistaken for the other princess, even though they hardly ever got to meet. 

Book bloggers and booktubers are equally important to the publishing world, and equally amazing in their own ways. There has always seemed to be a divide between the two communities, though, and they rarely seem to mingle online. Book bloggers and booktubers tend to keep to themselves, unless you do both, like me. Even then, I'll admit I much prefer talking to book bloggers. Booktubers in general just don't seem as friendly and approachable.

But that's not what I'm here to talk about. This is.



I'm here to talk about a panel at BEA, called The Publishing Process: How Bloggers Have Changed the Game. I wasn't at BEA this year, but around 8pm UK time, Twitter flooded with angry tweets about the blogging panel which was apparently focusing on one particular booktuber. No book blogging. No booktubing. Just one booktuber.



It really frustrated me! I wasn't there so obviously I can't make a complete and unbiased opinion, but from the tweets I read it's clear that book bloggers were not being represented at all, or even appreciated. Um...American publicists, you realise book bloggers give huge amounts of publicity to books just as much as booktubers do, right?


I'm just sat here typing this from my little corner of England, and even here I'm devastated about how the panel seems to have been handled. Booktubing is not better than book blogging, both are equally effective, and I think telling book bloggers that booktubers are better was an especially bad move on BEA's part. And getting a booktuber who apparently doesn't even read blogs to be on the panel? What? I have nothing against this particular booktuber but...who decided that would be a good idea, especially on a blogging panel? Had I been there, I think I would've walked out, just like everyone else.


Both mediums each have a different reach, and that's understandable, but from what I've heard the panel wasn't handled very well at all. There are people saying the panel was wrongly named and it was actually supposed to be about publishers and how they work with booktubers, but still...BEA. Massive fail, dudes. Obviously I have no idea if the thing about having the wrong name is true or not, and personally I can't imagine such a big event which has been around for so long making a mistake like that, but there we go.

EDITED TO ADD: A member of the panel, author Alexandra Bracken, has tweeted an explanation about what happened. You can see it below. I really don't think it excuses what happened. Basically, they thought it was okay to say booktubers are superior because they didn't think book bloggers were in the audience to hear it. I also now think the misprint was a genuine mistake, but this explanation still doesn't sit well with me, because of what I just said above. What do you think?



Whatever happened, it definitely sparked some thought-provoking discussions. Contribute your thoughts, I'd love to know what everyone else thinks!


48 comments:

  1. I have nothing against booktubers, I follow a few on Youtube and I like watching their videos. I also followed the people speaking at this panel. Well, not anymore. I'm a bit insulted as a book blogger actually. I prefer blogging over booktube and I think that a panel about book blogging should have at least one book blogger on it instead of a booktuber that thinks she's better than everyone else.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Like you, I have nothing against booktubers, and most videos are fun to watch. To be honest, I think the panel should have ONLY consisted of book bloggers, and yet there were none. So weird!

      Delete
    2. I never even heard of a book tuber before this. Apparently I just use Youtube to listen to music without buying it. Oh and to watch movie/TV trailers.

      I don't think I'll start watching them, no offense but I just absorb a written review better. It's how my brain works, hah.

      Delete
  2. Hi Amber,

    Thanks for this post. I cant believe I have been blogging for 6 years now and have never heard the term booktubing before.

    I agree there is always a place for all kinds of mediums. First time on your blog and I look forward to reading more of your great content.

    Thanks for sharing,

    Beth :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Beth! I've been blogging for nearly 5 years and hadn't heard of booktubing either until last summer. Thank you for your comment, I'm glad you like my blog :D

      Delete
  3. I don't get why there is so much hostility against book bloggers. I've seen it on BookTube..And I agree that most are super duper friendly, but the bigger ones..well aren't. There's also been an uproar about Amazon wishlists where I feel like people are taking advantage of their subscribers generosity and getting books. Personally, I try to think of the positives they bring even though there's a warning bell in my head, that what they're doing isn't right. Hopefully one day, they'll realize it. It's very weird to me too since I'm both. There wasn't this many BookTubers on YouTube before and I started in 2011..I find that's it's more of a popularity contest too.

    I'm still pretty disgusted at the fact that the publisher said books are being sold more by BookTubers than bloggers. That's utterly degrading to hear. And I'm a little upset they think like that :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've seen it too and completely agree that some of the bigger booktubers are really unfriendly. Like, you might tag them in a challenge and they'll completely blank you. Send them a tweet saying how much you love their videos and you get ignored. It really sucks and I think it contributes to this whole 'divide' thing because most big book bloggers in our community reply to people and interact, so why can't they? It's a two-way street.

      About the Amazon wishlists: I agree! I've seen bigger booktubers doing 'birthday hauls' where they show off all the books fans sent, and it just seems really, really weird, to me. There's something not right about it. I have an Amazon wishlist but I didn't start it so subscribers could buy me books, it was because book blogging friends kept asking me for a wishlist and I didn't have one. I don't even link to it on my channel.

      It definitely seems like more of a popularity contest over on YouTube too. I think maybe because looks come into it. With book blogging, the only chance people have to get to know you is through your writing - looks don't come into it at all. But on YouTube, it's as if people are like 'if you're not hot, I'm not watching.' Since becoming a 'booktuber' (I feel really weird using that word, to be honest) I've definitely become more insecure. I thought it would have the opposite effect.

      It upsets me too. We didn't start to sell books, we started because of our love of books. It sucks to be talked about as a marketing tool.

      Sorry for the long comment, I'm just happy someone finally shares the same opinions as me about all of this. It seemed like I was the only one.

      Thanks for commenting! :)

      Delete
    2. I agree too! Especially about the wishlists! And I didn't even start my blog to sell books. I started it because I wanted to share my love for books and give my opinion on them.

      Delete
  4. There's a little elitist circle of book tubers that seem to think they're better than everyone else. I've grown overly tired of the drama that always stems from them and this is one. It really shows how unprofessional and immature these people are. Do they not understand that it's wrong to bash at other people? Have they not learnt that you shouldn't act superior to other people? God made us all equals.. even if you don't believe in that then you should believe in fairness and equality. It just irks me.. I truly don't like their work and life ethics in general which is why I have slowly stopped following them. However, I must point out, some famous book tubers are so sweet and never look down on other people and I still follow those and love them.. so the whole "these people are hating on us because we're famous" can't work and only really shows me that they DO think of themselves as famous people. Eat some humble pie for God's sake. I am both a booktuber and blogger but booktuber drama has become too much for me. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Honestly, I've considered quitting booktube many times because of the drama which seems to stem from them. I used to like their videos, but they only interact with a select few. There is no community in booktubing, or not that I've seen, anyway.

      I don't believe in God but I definitely believe in equality and fairness, which is why I'm so upset and frustrated about all of this. The booktube drama has become too much for me, too! Thanks for your thoughtful comment <3

      Delete
  5. I don't mind booktubing, but for me, I prefer to read blogs than watch videos. That said, it's so strange to have a panel that supposed to be talking about book blogging, that actually doesn't really do that at all, and instead talks about an complete different media to talk about books, videos.

    Never the less, I still wish I was a BEA - personally, I think they should create BEB (Book Expo Britain)!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As a booktuber, I prefer reading blogs too, which is probably weird but it's what developed my love of books even further!

      BEB is such an awesome idea! Oh my gosh, we need this so much. I wish all the British publishers would get together and do it, that would be so cool :D

      Thanks for commenting, Vick! :)

      Delete
  6. I don't like booktubing. That's nothing against the booktubers themselves, it's just that I don't like watching videos. That's MY personal preference. There's a reason why I chose not to go to the vlogging panel — I knew it wasn't for me. But I thought this panel sounded REALLY interesting and had a cool lineup of speakers... Then at the beginning they cracked a joke and said, "This whole panel is about how awesome this booktuber is". I kind of laughed. But it turns out, that was 100% accurate. The whole thing was about her and her YouTube channel and her vlogging... and they spoke to a whole room of BOOK BLOGGERS and said "vloggers are more influential than booktubers". After that, I left the room. I didn't want to be spoken down to and the whole panel was extremely misleading. Had I known it was going to be about vlogging at all, I wouldn't have attended. But the whole panel was described as being about BOOK BLOGGERS — not vloggers or booktubers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been hoping someone who actually attended the panel would comment, and it sounds like the panel was just as bad as the tweets I saw described. How could they say that to a room of book bloggers?! That's SO rude! This whole thing is just infuriating, and I'm quickly losing respect for some of the people involved.

      Delete
    2. I saw on the website that some people from the Disney book group were also speaking, don't know if that's true, but they also lose my respect. I'm ditching booktube. I thought we were all booknerds and booklovers together, but apparently we're not. I prefer the blogging community anyways. Bloggers are so much nicer!

      Delete
    3. "They said that to a whole room of book bloggers" as opposed to what? BookTubers? Well that's because the blogging community is huge and the BookTube community is small, but growing. The idea was to show Publishing companies that they should open their eyes to the BookTube community and to start sending review copies, etc to them as well. Nobody was saying anyone was better than anyone else.

      Now that being said, Christine IS one of the best BookTubers ever and anyone will tell you that. She went to film school and has had her two YouTube channels for years. She works harder than anyone I know and is always pushing herself to be the best that she can be. She is one of the nicest people you will ever meet and is so genuine. She just hit a huge millstone on her YouTube channel of 100,000 subscribers which is huge and I'm so, so happy for her.

      She was on that panel with author, Alexandra Bracken and as Alex tweeted, they were told to keep the panel "BookTuber specific" and to share their own stories, which is all they know of course.

      Blogging and BookTube are both so amazing and both do so much for the publishing industry. Some people prefer watching video reviews and some prefer to read reviews. There's a little for everyone!

      Delete
    4. @Jessica Sorry but I think you're kind of missing the point. Both communities are huge and growing. I understand what the idea was behind the panel, but the fact is, some of the direct quotes I have read were wrong and hurtful. 'Nobody was saying anyone was better than anyone else.' A few people I know attended that panel and were tweeting direct quotes throughout. It was said AND implied quite a few times, according to them.

      I can't comment on whether Christine is 'one of the best booktubers ever' as I don't watch her videos, and I didn't name her in this post because I think that would have been unfair. I don't know her or what she's like, but I didn't want people to get the wrong idea of her, so I was letting others figure it out for themselves who it was, and to make their own judgement. It's not relevant that she went to film school or that she has 100,000 subscribers, the issue is these insulting things which were said.

      There is a little for everyone, I agree, so I wish everyone would just get along and stop being horrible to each other. :/

      Delete
  7. I LOVE this post - you're so quick off the mark, Amber! Ok, so my two cents - I don't think they could have got the name of the spot wrong, apparently they have a whole other section to do with vlogging, and really the distinction is there and it isn't difficult. I watch booktubers - some are far better than others, I really click with some and love them, and others it's just...no. Personality and how you come across on-camera has a big part to play in book-tubing. Yes, the successful ones do have more of a reach, I've seen some videos with upwards of 30,000 hits. That's impressive and I congratulate them, but I will say that I tend to skim through most videos and forward to parts I like, and I watch hauls and unboxing videos more than I watch reviews... in fact I don't think I've watched many reviews at all, whereas I will read a blog review, I read a lot of them. I don't have any negative opinions on booktubers, I just feel like I'm not part of that community, because I don't contribute to it, but I have linked to booktuber accounts before on my blog - go me and my "cross-community" work. I think the whole thing that was sparked tonight will reflect badly on the publishers and BEA - it's adding to if not creating tension where there shouldn't be any, and most likely wouldn't be as much. I think a lot of what they said (from what I've read) is grossly unfair. AND on top of that, why focus on only one booktuber?? What about the rest of them?? This sounds like a complete PR nightmare and a massive fail on behalf of BEA. As a new blogger even I'm gutted by some of what was said. Booktubing and bookblogging are different - each has pros and cons, but both forms take hard work, passion and dedication, and both forms ultimately have the same goal - to share a love of books. Rant over.

    P.S is that a new website background?? Lovin' it :)

    R x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hehe thank you! If you're right and there is a whole other section for vlogging then this whole 'mislabelled' thing sounds even more like an excuse than it did before. And while some videos have upwards of 30,000 hits...so do some blogs. So I really don't understand how anyone on the panel could have said that booktubers are better. We really are equal, we just reach different audiences. I'd say audience sizes seem pretty much the same.

      I'm a booktuber and even I don't feel part of the community. At all. Since I started in July 2013, it's mostly just seemed like a really unfriendly place.

      Yep, I've got a new background and I think you're the first who's noticed! Thank you! :D x

      Delete
    2. Hi Amber. Must defend my integrity here and assure you that it's not an "excuse": https://twitter.com/BookExpoAmerica/status/471622347817222144

      I've also clarified the situation on Tumblr, here: http://alexbracken.tumblr.com/post/87147405805/about-that-bloggercon-panel

      Delete
    3. Thank you for taking the time to write up an explanation. :-)

      Delete
    4. I doubted myself after I posted about the background - but yay! Go me :)

      I've read the blogpost from the author Alex already today separately from this and tweeted about it. I think it's a good explanation of what happened, it's just unfortunate it wasn't managed better. I think the whole scenario stoked the embers of underlying issues between the communities that the panel perhaps weren't aware of and caused accidental insult and injury. Kudos for addressing it directly though, Alex. It as both brave and well-put!

      R

      Delete
  8. This was definitely shocking to hear, I started out as a booktuber (only three months) but I found the blogging community was more welcoming. I don't have anything against BookTubers though, although I find the "wishlist" on each video rather irritating, but I regularly watch booktubers and I regularly read book blogs.

    It really is not a contest, both platforms bring something to the table and we need to unite not divide. I think those who create divide clearly need to think before they speak, it's not professional and if publishers think that that is the sort of person they want representing their brands clearly have something wrong with them.

    I believe this conference was clearly labelled wrong and maybe BEA reps need to look into this and make sure next years experience is a lot better for the audience it is intended for.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I find the blogging community more welcoming and a lot nicer, too. I'm actually embarrassed to have a booktube channel right now.

      Agreed, those who create divide need to think before they speak. I hope you don't think I was creating divide by writing this blog post, I just needed to get my thoughts out there and also I wanted to know what everyone else thought.

      BEA definitely needs to look into this because it's really reflected badly on them.

      Delete
    2. Don't worry, I didn't think you were creating a divide, in fact your first paragraph (which is very awesome by the way) clearly states how you feel about them both. You simply shared something for discussion on your own platform and it is something I know everyone will have an opinion on.

      Don't feel embarrassed to have a channel because you're clearly one of those gems who sees the worth in both platforms and BookTube can't afford to lose someone who stands for equality!

      Stay awesome!

      Delete
  9. I started out watching Booktube videos before I created my blog, as I'm a relatively new book blogger and there was always this sort of exclusivity to book tubing. And while there are booktubers who are really genuinely sweet and reply to stuff, most of the bigger ones don't really interact all too much. Especially with tag videos, they really only tag their friends and those within their circle.

    That panel really just sounds insulting and I would probably just have walked out too if I were at that panel. Still want to go to BEA because of all the books and book swag, but :/

    The whole concept of the Amazon wishlists is just somewhat foreign to me. It's a little uncomfortable to have subscribers send you books. I tend to skip over those parts in book haul videos just because of the uncomfortableness.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I still want to go to BEA too! I think this was (hopefully) just a one-time mistake.

      Delete
  10. I attended this session, for a little while. Until I moved next door to a better one. Titles matter (as all bloggers know well!), and this title did not keep its promise.

    But it did help me find your blog while sitting in my NYC hotel room. How cool is that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So cool, and I hope you're having a good time at BEA! :D

      Delete
  11. This whole thing is crazy. I completely missed it and it's kind of part of the reason I've never attended the Book Blogger Convention. It's never been handled well and I'm not going to pay money to go to something that will belittle me and what I do. I am shocked that one of my fave authors, Alex Bracken, was on this particular panel and I'm hoping that she didn't say anything bad toward bloggers.

    As for booktubing doing more, that comes as a surprise to me since I never watch booktuber videos. Obviously, I'm not the be all-end all of what sells or whatever, but I never realized it was really that big of a thing. I do videos as well as blogging, but I guess I went away for a while when it was starting to get big and I'm just now getting back to it. My first love though is definitely blogging and it's something that has been helping publishers out for years now, much longer than the whole booktubing thing (I'm entering my 7th year as a book blogger next month). It does seem very callous to put down book bloggers at a BOOK BLOGGER CONFERENCE and when blogs have been around longer than this booktubing community.

    Either way, both mediums have their place and there are some great people out there (I know more on the blogging side though since that's what I've mainly been doing). It just kind of sucks that the elitist ones get the most attention but hopefully this backlash will help in the long run. If you're not good to your fans, it'll eventually catch up to you. Confessionsofabookgeek above has a great point that I feel gets lost sometimes- we're all in this to share our love of books, which is why it's so odd that we can't all just get along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Crazy is the right word! If you go to the BEA hashtag on Twitter, you can find direct quotes from the panel, but I'm not sure which panel member said each quote. Alex Bracken has also given a public apology and explanation (on Tumblr, I think?) so maybe it was the other people on the panel, not her. Who knows! It's very hard to judge without having been there, but I just wanted to get my opinion out.

      I really do think it was a hugely bad thing to do. Even if the panel DID think the audience was only booktubers...how does that make it okay to say all of these horrible things about book bloggers? It definitely could have been worded and handled better than it was. Happy blogoversary for next month, by the way - such an awesome achievement! :D

      Yes, we're all in this for the love of books, so I wish everyone would just be happy.

      Delete
  12. Alexandra Bracken tweeted that the idea was pitched to them as being booktuber specific so they were to only focus on their experiences. BEA asked Christine to be apart of it so she accepted, even though BEA knew that Christine was only strictly a BookTuber and not a Blogger.

    People were more upset because the title of the panel was inaccurate, which Alexandra Bracken also talked about. Bloggers basically got upset because they weren't mentioned at all, just BookTubers. The deal is that Blogging has been around for a long, long time where as the BookTube community is newer. Publishing companies are just now starting to find the BookTube community. That panel was to talk about how publishers should not just focus on only bloggers but also branch out to the BookTube community on YouTube because as some people mentioned "they reach out to a lot of non-readers"

    Anyways, both are amazing. I myself am a BookTuber AND a blogger. Both reach out to tons and are both important.

    Everyone needs to calm down a little and accept everyone. I'm going to say at the end of the day it was BEA's fault for naming the panel the title that they did. The end.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She did. I'm not sure if you read my whole blog post, but I did add those tweets in before you commented.

      Bloggers aren't just upset because we weren't mentioned at all. If you go to the BEA hashtag on Twitter, there are direct quotes from the panel which say things like book blogging doesn't matter, booktubing is 'the new and better thing.' I can't remember them off the top of my head but they were pretty much what I just said, although you'd have to go and look to find the full quotes. Basically they were saying our love of books is inferior because we write instead of letting readers see our faces and hear our voices, and that we're not important. Even if the panel thought the audience was JUST booktubers, how does that make it okay to have said all of that? I'm pretty sure if the situation had been flipped and bloggers were on the panel saying booktubing is inferior, to an audience of booktubers, the outcome would have been exactly the same.

      You're right, both booktubers and bloggers are amazing and equally important. We all do this because of our love of books anyway, none of us are in this just to sell books.

      Definitely a fault on BEA's part but I think the panel should have been scripted beforehand because some of the things they said were hurtful and harmful - some bloggers are quitting blogging because of what they were told by the panel.

      Delete
  13. It's about time someone said what everyone is thinking Amber, and I'm glad you did, because you do it well! I periodically do videos, but lately I've been focusing on my blogging, and if I'm honest, I do prefer blogging to the booktube side of things, I feel more comfortable typing and writing my words rather than saying them, it takes less time and generally, I feel like I get my message across better. The're a huge difference in how I see these two different platforms, youtube, personally, is a place to show off book covers and synopsis, which frankly, I can do on Goodreads, while blogs are much more diverse, allow for a lot more varied content and, I think, are a better platform to work with. I don't like to see myself as someone who dislikes booktubers, because I don't, but I'm definitely on the blogger side of things here; you can't try to have an informed discussion about people without knowing anything about the people, or having those people involved, it's not fair, not moral and not right, end of. Great discussion though! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, I'm glad you think so! You know, I feel exactly the same, to be honest. Blogging is a lot more diverse and, like you, I've never disliked booktubers but I'm definitely on our side here. The things said in that panel were just really rude.

      Delete
  14. When I first heard about the panel I thought it was a great idea! But they clearly didn't handle it well. I think the idea behind the title of the panel is important, and I think talking about booktubers is important but they seem to have confused the two. I agree 100% that booktubers deserve their own panel, but the title was a complete mistake. Maybe it was a ploy to get more people to attend. Perhaps they thought not as many people would attend a booktubers panel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure about it being a ploy to get more people to attend and, if it was, then it failed anyway because half of the room walked out upon being belittled for blogging. Yes, booktubers should have their own panel. Was there one, except from this? I know there was another section for vlogging but I haven't heard about any of the panels or events that happened there.

      Delete
  15. I was in attendance. It was a hostile room. I don't blame Christine, in fact I feel v sorry for her, but the fact that she stated in the previous panel that she doesn't read reviews/book bloggers wasn't a good start. It was a framing issue but there were multiple instances where panelists were saying things that were (even if unintended) dismissive of book bloggers, specifically with regards to reach, word of mouth, non-readers and hits. There was an implied hierarchy that attendees didn't respond to. Had the panel title been in alignment with the panel brief AND attendee perception it wouldn't have been an issue. However, Christina has spoken on the previous vlogging/podcast session (2 BookTubers, 1 Podcaster) so it's understandable that ppl were confused why two consecutive sessions (of a total nine) were 'focused' on BookTubers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad to be getting responses from people who were actually there, it gives everyone more insight into what actually happened. I can definitely believe the atmosphere was hostile, after what people on the panel said! Poor Christine. I'm not sure if she was the one who said some of the hurtful things but it must have been an awkward situation to be in.

      Delete
  16. Why have a panel without anyone who is a book blogger? Seriously? I love watching YouTube videos. Personally I prefer blogging though, I gave making videos a go and for now at least, it really isn't for me. Book bloggers are a lot more easy to approach and I like the community that there is here.
    BookTubers, none of which actually blog, have the right to say that what they do is better unless they do both in my opinion. And even then, is it really their place to claim this?
    xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think it's anyone's place to claim which medium is better or has the most impact. No one, not even publishers, know every single blogger's stats and every single booktuber's stats in the world, and without that, who can say? xx

      Delete
  17. This makes me sad, and a little angry. Book blogging and booktubing shouldn't be competing against each other - they should be uniting. We would have one really strong bookish community if so. It makes me really sad that someone would say that at a panel FOR bloggers. Surely they would've realised how hurtful that would be? It's hurt me and I wasn't even there! Booktubing is a trend that's really taken off over the last few years but book blogging has been around for MANY years, and consistently. I should think we be more appreciated than that. :(

    Was it Christine who said that? That makes me even sadder because I support her by watching her videos all the time. Gosh... Has she apologised or anything?

    WHY DOES THERE HAVE TO BE SO MUCH DRAMA? Why can't every book lover just be fwiends? :'(

    Great post! I may do a RE post sharing my own views between the two communities inspired by this post, if that's okay, of course? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know who said what, but Christine was the booktuber on the panel. I looked at her Twitter and she hasn't acknowledged the panel or what happened at all so who knows...

      A response post would be awesome, I look forward to reading it. ^-^

      Thanks for your comment! :)

      Delete
  18. I didn't even know there was such a thing as book tubers-I'm assuming this is someone who does reviews on youtube? I am so out of the loop, lol.

    Just found your blog and now following through bloglovin :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. Dang that's some bullshit about how booktubers are better or superior whatever compared to book bloggers BECAUSE THEY'RE NOT. Both provide great information about books and one isn't better than the other. I also read Giselle's comment about the amazon wishlist and yours and I agree how it's so weird some booktubers are putting their amazon wishlist on their description boxes each video... It makes sense to put that if it's their birthday but each video? I feel like that's not right.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I wasn't even aware this happened, but this is incredibly interesting. I personally think book bloggers and booktoubers are equal and should be treated equally by publishers. Most booktoubers started out with book blogs and for BEA to throw that out the window and pick somebody who doesn't even read blog was a terrible decision on their part.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Book bloggers and booktubers are EQUAL. Most booktubers started out with small book blogs and for BEA to choose somebody to represent booktube who doesn't connect with bloggers is a poor choice on their part. I don't care if it was a name mistake. That's still irrelevant. Booktube from this panel seems to have held themselves in a higher retrospect. (I'm not saying all booktube, but since I don't know who the specif vlogger is, it's easier to address it as a whole.) One thing that does bother me is that booktubers are being sent stuff randomly by their viewers for no reason at all. That's sweet and a great thing to do, but it makes me wonder if booktubers care about the people who send massive amounts of stuff or if they just want ways to get more free books.

    ReplyDelete